God

...now browsing by tag

 
 

The Focus Of The Church (A Retro-post by Horatius Bonar)

Sunday, July 9th, 2017

“And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all.” 1 Corinthians 15:28

“That God may be all in all’ is the basis of all apostolic doctrine, from which it sets out, and into which it returns, and round which it revolves. ‘Of Him, and through Him, and to Him, are all things,’ is the refrain of the apostle’s songs; a refrain which the whole early Church took up and sung with so loud a harmony, that the sound went over earth, and pagan nations awoke, startled at the name of the one living and true God, King eternal, immortal, and invisible, the only wise God, so different from their Jupiter, their Mercury, and other such false and unclean gods. The burden of these doxologies is: Glory to that eternal Jehovah who worketh all in all, who filleth all in all.

God is the doer as well as the purposer of everything connected with the Christ, and of everything relating to the redeemed and their connection with the Christ, who is the centre of all His purposes and desires. The Church is His creation. Each saint is His creation. There is no religion in a man save that which originates with Him, and is consummated by Him. Religion that is self-made, consisting of doctrines, feelings, rites, self-taught and self-wrought, is no better than ancient paganism. ‘We are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them’ (Eph. 2:10): that is, we are His workmanship, not our own (ver. 8); nay, we are His ‘creation,’1 nay, His creation in and by Christ Jesus; and all this for ‘good works,’ for which God had made all this vast preparation, ‘that we should walk in them.’

Thus God is in Christ purposing concerning us; for Christ and the redeemed are inseparable in the eternal purpose of the Father. That purpose embraces both, and embodies the mutual relationship of the one to the other. It contemplates also, and makes preparation for, the holiness of each redeemed one, as well as for the perfection of the whole Church of God; as it is written, ‘Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began, but is now made manifest by the appearing of our Saviour Jesus Christ’ (2 Tim. 1:9, 10).

Thus God is in Christ working concerning us; for all His operations for us and in us are in connection with the Christ. From the first touch of His hand, when He arrests us in our folly, to the last, when He finishes the glorious work in the resurrection of our bodies, all His doings concerning us are ‘in Christ.’ ‘He created all things by Jesus Christ,’ is as true of the new creation as of the old. He is the former of all things, the Lord of Hosts is His name. Each hour bears witness to the unceasing and unwearied touches of His hand in moulding us anew after His own image. And all this is the working and the purposing of ‘love,’—the love of God which is in Jesus Christ our Lord. And all this to the praise of the glory of His grace, that God may be all in all.

Thus God is in Christ reconciling us to Himself; for the reconciliation comes through this living channel, and this only. God approaches us in Christ, lays hold on us in Christ, looks at us in Christ, makes proposals to us in Christ, links us to Himself in Christ. ‘You hath He reconciled in the body of His flesh through death’ (Col. 1:22). The reconciliation of the covenant is Christ Jesus our Lord. Save in Him, there is no nearness, no favour, no friendship, no fellowship. The one Mediator is the one reconciler, through whom God says to us, ‘Come unto me;’ and as there is but one mediation, so there is but one atonement, one propitiation, one reconciliation; one cross, one blood, one death, one burial, one resurrection. For in each of these Christ is all. ‘He of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption.’”

1 The words ‘creation’ and ‘workmanship’ remind us of the expressions used in reference to the first creation, ‘His work which God created and made’ (Gen. 2:3).

Horatius Bonar, The Christ of God. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1874), 144–147. [Italics original.]

Spiritual Lessons From A Cup Of Coffee

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

Earlier today I took my middle daughter, Nadia, to a local McDonalds for “a Daddy date.” She enjoyed a milk and some fries, while I leisurely sipped a coffee (not exactly gourmet arabica beans, but then again, it was kinder to my wallet than other high end places!) As I enjoyed this java infusion, I noted this inscription upon my cup: “My moment to unwind. It’s these moments I crave. My time to indulge myself…My moment to celebrate.” This credo obviously appeals to the spirit of the age. A new television program in the United States is unsubtly titled “You deserve it.” One of our local billboards boldly proclaimed: “You, you, you…it’s all about you.” All around the message trumpeted to people is their central importance to the world and how they merit special treatment. Yet in reality, the universe is designed to operate with someone else at the center of things: God the Creator is to be of paramount importance.

Rather than being worthy of good things, we actually deserve judgment (Rom. 3:19.) God gives good things to us – life, breath, health, families, friends, intellects, time, food, and much else – because He is gracious. He gives in keeping with His generous character, rather than by human merit. As one Christian friend once reminded me: “On my bad days, I remind myself that by rights I ought to be in hell.” Indeed, so should everyone! Thankfully, Christ died and rose again so that those who receive Him as Savior could pass from spiritual death to eternal life and enjoy the real center of the universe forever: God Himself.

TO DOWNLOAD IN PDF., CLICK HERE: “Spiritual Lessons From A Cup Of Coffee